7 Dominican Street Food Delicacies

7 Dominican Street Food Delicacies

Without question, the Dominican Republic is famous for its love of rice, beans, and meat, mouth-watering stews, Dominican street food, and the seemingly omni-present plantain chip the Toston, which you’ll definitely come across on your travels along the north coast, or pretty much anywhere Dominicans are found on the planet.

But what about those inner-city and roadside treats for the adventurous traveler with a palate for the not-so mainstream cuisine?

We’ve put together 7 Dominican street food delicacies that you’ll encounter during your day and night out on the town in the City of Puerto Plata, Sosua, or Cabarete.

1. Queso Hoja

Departing from the city of Santiago de los Caballeros, apart from fresh fruits like Papayas, Watermelons, and tangy Mandarins, you’ll notice that in almost every “quick-stop” produce stand in route to Puerto Plata, there are little transparent bags with a white ball inside hanging from the edge of the kiosk, that my friends is Queso de Hoja or Leaf Cheese.

Mostly popular in the Dominican Republic and Ecuador, Queso de Hojo (leaf cheese) can be enjoyed all on its own, by peeling away at the thin cheesy layers like a slightly salted mozzarela stick with a punch.     

You may also enjoy: 5 Top Dominican Foods in Punta Cana   

2. Quipe or Kipe

Although its recipe was brought to the island of Hispaniola decades ago by middle-eastern settlers, the Quipe (kee-pay) or Kibbe is a conical shaped treat adored by almost all Dominicans, with a crunchy fried Bulgur exterior, met with a beef or stripped chicken filling that’ll blow your taste buds out of the stratosphere. 

The Quipe can be eaten with a variety of dips and sauces to enhance its flavor, but most Dominicans prefer their own type of “Mayochup” that has a sweeter taste to it compared to its foreign counterparts. 

3. Pica pollo (peeka po-yo) and Batata Fries

 

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As you make your way through the city, it’ll become obvious that there are a whole lot of fried chicken spots in Puerto Plata, the famous Pica Pollos, batter dipped fried chicken each with their own “secret seasoning”, just blasting with spices. 

To best to go along with your chickeny goodness is a side of fat Batata Fries or Sweet Potato Fries, giving you a sweet-n-sour flavor. 

4. Pica Longa and Carne Salada

If you’re a meat lover, the North Coast is peppered with Carne Salada (salted meat) and Pica Longa stands in almost every municipality and small country side village. 

Pica Longa shacks specialize is preparing home-made unprocessed Longaniza (Dominican Sausage) which is diced into little rolls and then deep fried in corn oil, for a combination of chewy, and savory crunchiness that melts in your mouth.

Carne Salada (salted pork or beef meat) on the other hand, is first lightly beaten and hung out to dry in the open air, seasoned with pepper, salt, and herbs like cilantro and oregano, then fried to reach a Jerk meat consistency. 

Just squeeze a couple of slices of fresh lime on each dish, accompanied with Tostones or Fritos, and you’ll be living it up like a local Dominican yourself.

You may also enjoy: 5 Little-Known Costa Rican Snacks That You Shouldn’t Miss

5. Empanadas

 

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The Empanada is one the quickest and most readily available fried street foods that you can have, made fresh on the spot with a simple doughy mix of flower, water, and a dash of salt, where you can add your choice of cheese, meat, or vegetable filling. 

6. Chulas

 

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On your street food adventure itinerary, Chulas (Choo-lahs) are made from a Yuca derived paste (Yuca being an ages old vegetable staple from Indigenous times) best with Queso de Hoja filling. 

You’ll most likely have to visit some of the inner-city streets of Puerto Plata or Sosua to get your hands on the authentic Home-Made Chulas that people sell from their doorstep. 

7. Tostadas

The Dominican version of the Panini, Tostadasare toasted bread sandwiches with Danish Cheese and thinly sliced ham, with of course lettuce and tomatoes, and pretty much any other condiments you want. 

These toasts are relatively inexpensive, and are most likely to be found near hospitals, clinics, or gyms where the demand for a healthier snack is higher, served with Lemon, Melon, or Chinola (passion fruit) non-fructose-based Juices.

You may also enjoy: 5 Typical Ingredients of Jamaican Cuisine

Which one of these Dominican street food delicacies would you try? 

About Maria Kennedy

Maria Kennedy is the managing editor at Travel for Food Hub. Maria is on a full-tilt mission to share local food and travel inspiration. When she is not writing about food and travel, startups or social media, she is enjoying her time with her boys in sunny Spain.

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