Home / North America / USA / 6 Best Food Markets To Eat In New York
New York food market

6 Best Food Markets To Eat In New York

The food market scene is a blossoming combination of community and culinary accomplishment in New York. For those who love to have all their options in one place, food halls and markets are quickly becoming a popular dining destination in the city. The food markets in New York bring together food stands from some of the best varieties of cuisine to a single location, ensuring the opportunity for a different meal every visit.

All the convenience of a street vendor mixes with communal seating for a hybrid of fast food and a sit down meal that serves as a nice change of pace for the typical New Yorker. Read on to find out the best food markets to eat in New York.

Smorgasburg

This open-air food market is a weekend must-see. Smorgasburg is the largest market of its kind in America. The location alternates between Williamsburg and Prospect Park every Saturday and Sunday, respectively. You can choose between a hundred different stands serving anything from trendy raindrop cakes to traditional chicken wings.

This site is truly a spectacle for anyone who is interested in having a global dining experience without leaving the comfort of the city. Vendors come from all over New York to bring together foods from every continent, as well as eye-catching food parings you won’t find anywhere else. Beer gardens and dietary accommodations ensure this to be the perfect place for anyone to grab a bite to eat. The Sunday market at Prospect Park also allows for your furry friends to join in on the festivities.

Gotham West Market 

A dining staple located in Hell’s Kitchen is the Gotham West Market. This food hall contains a variety of menu items from several different vendors. Ten food stands congregate under one roof to facilitate a communal eating experience fit for a large group or just you alone.

The market brings a global flare to the city with cuisine from Japan, Italy, and Mexico, to name a few. Most of the vendors are smaller versions of popular New York restaurants that have condensed into an accessible space. This makes it possible to have a steaming bowl of ramen, a fresh slice of pizza, and a refreshing scoop of ice cream all in one sitting if you want to. If you’re having trouble deciding what you want for lunch, have a bit of everything at the Gotham West Market.

Union Square Greenmarket

Every Monday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday, Union Square Park hosts a Greenmarket. Greenmarkets are a part of a movement in New York City to provide access to food from local farmers. Union Square is just one of over fifty locations where shoppers can buy fresh produce and wholesale purchases.

Baked goods, fish, fruits, and vegetables are available throughout the year, with certain varietal changes based on the season. Not only is Greenmarket the perfect place to buy local and fresh, it also provides a way for visitors to connect with farmers and chefs from the area. Cooking demonstrations by the Natural Gourmet Institute and education stations for students are also large parts of the market. Additionally, the market holds a food scrap collection for compost every day it is open, as well as clothing collections on Monday and Saturday.

Chelsea Market

Get your fill of shopping and feasting at the Chelsea Market. Formerly a Nabisco factory, this building is made up of restaurants, shops, and offices for several broadcasting companies.

TAKEAWAY: Food network shows such as Iron Chef America were filmed at the market complex at one time. Iron Chef, Morimoto, has a restaurant of in Chelsea Market.

Like many of the other markets on this list, Chelsea Market offers a large food variety that is sure to satisfy any food craving. You can allow yourself to shop freely from morning to night with food selections that fit every meal profile. Enjoy a nice cup of coffee and pastry from one of the several bakeries for breakfast, and head over to the oyster bar for dinner. If you find yourself more interested in the drinks than the food, you can always visit the Chelsea Wine Vault for fine wines and tastings.

City Kitchen

Una publicación compartida de Ina (@iripiriii) el

City Kitchen is the Times Square food market you won’t want to miss. The market takes pride in featuring restaurants that hail from all over the city. Seven restaurants offer dishes like steak tacos, lobster rolls, and falafel.

The building has three entry points into City Kitchen. No matter where you are, you can easily grab a meal. The convenient location is great for those who are touring the city or looking for a bite before a Broadway show. If you’d rather stay in for lunch or dinner, most of the restaurants have a delivery option as well.

Eataly

Eataly is a food hall with locations all over the world, including two in New York. More than just a collection of restaurants, this marketplace hosts a cooking school where you can learn to make the same meals served at their food counters. Just like the name suggests, Eataly is all about delicious and authentic Italian food served fresh.

Food accommodations like gluten-free and kosher products make this Italian eatery enjoyable for all kinds of food fans. Dine in or carry out at your leisure here, because both the Downtown and Flatiron locations have a lot to offer. If you have the time, be sure to stop by and take a class. Cooking demonstrations include samplings of chef-created dishes and wine pairings for the meal.

Food markets are made for those who love to eat, cook, and learn. No matter where in the city you find yourself, dining at one of these markets will satisfy any craving. Each market is unique and full of familiar and not so familiar fare that showcases some of New York’s best food under one roof.

If you are looking to indulge in a homegrown culinary trend, fresh ingredients and the knowhow to use them, or even a bit of New York food history, check out of one these food markets on your next visit.

About Alison Whittington

Alison Whittington is a recent graduate, completing her B.A. in writing, rhetoric, and technical communications with a double minor in book arts and Asian studies at James Madison University. Aside from writing, her passions include watching Netflix, eating pizza, and petting as many dogs as possible.

Check Also

Halloween treats US

4 Spooky Halloween Treats You Can Find In The US

In the US, Halloween is one of the most beloved holidays, and we hold nothing …

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *